School of Nursing and Center for Spirituality & Healing Spring 2020 Virtual Commencement Ceremony

Celebrating the graduation of University of Minnesota School of Nursing students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN), Post-Baccalaureate and Post-Master's Certificate, Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and PhD in Nursing programs, and graduates from the Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing's Post-Baccalaureate Certificate, and Master of Arts in Integrative Health and Wellbeing Coaching programs.

See additional virtual commencement content and the personalized graduation slides at https://vgrad.z19.web.core.windows.net/umn/xv/index.html

For more information on the University of Minnesota School of Nursing, visit http://www.nursing.umn.edu

Learn more about the Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing at csh.umn.edu.

Subtitles and Closed Captions

[Dean Connie White Delaney] Students, family members, friends,
faculty, staff, and guests.
Welcome to the University of Minnesota School of Nursing
2020 virtual commencement ceremony.
We share deep gratitude to and for you.
We are honored to share
this moment to award your degrees and
certificates acknowledging your scholarly achievement,
and exceptional practice.
Today we come together as community to celebrate,
even though we can't physically gather.
Graduates of the Class of 2020 -
While you won't be walking
across the Northrop stage today,
you will be walking through history.
This is a special class that will
forever be remembered and not because it
was the first to have its classes and
commencement ceremony shifted to online.
The class of 2020 will forever be
remembered because what you
have experienced will make you different.
It will shape the way you pursue the profession.
You'll carry forward the imagination and
innovation that have been lived
in your final months of being students.
These will remind you of what is possible.
They will remind you of the resilience you have shown.
These experiences will empower
you throughout your career and life.
We celebrate the class of 2020
in the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife,
and just days after
the 200th anniversary of
the birth of Florence Nightingale.
It is amazing that the focus on infection control,
data, sanitation, sun, and the care,
love and compassion for others that have
been revealed in this pandemic were all
rooted in her experiences in
the Crimean war more than 160 years ago.
And did you know that
the first public health nursing courses offered by
our school was in response
to the influenza impact of 1917.
Experiences shape the future,
and there is little doubt the class of 2020 will have
a profound impact on the future of nursing.
Graduates, your future is now,
you will begin making an impact immediately.
Why nursing? Why now, you ask?
Nursing encompasses leading and
collaborating in the care of individuals of all ages,
babies, families, groups, communities.
Nursing embraces the sick or well,
in all health living and community settings.
And nursing embraces the essential synergy
across the promotion of health,
prevention of illness, care of the ill,
disabled, and dying people.
Nursing fosters empowering the people, families,
and communities to perform all activities
contributing to health, or recovery,
or to dignified death and performing
these when others are unable.
Nursing helps individuals, families,
and communities gain full or partial independence
as rapidly as possible.
Nursing gives bold voice to advocacy,
promotion of safe environments,
and a central call for research that supports
fact-based interventions and participation
in shaping health policy.
Nursing serves in the support and management
of care of patients and in health systems.
Nursing ensures education for
the next generations of nurses. Look around,
and never has there been a greater need for nurses.
Indeed, we are reaching a new level of
appreciation for the profession and its potential.
I close with the words of Richard Olding Beard,
a non-nurse whose pioneering advocacy led to
the first successful effort to establish
nursing in an institution of higher learning,
the very one for which you are earning your degree.
Beard highlighted the "educated spirit of the nurse",
noting, "Nurses help society
recognize the worth of human life,
conserve human health, and provide for social justice."
School of Nursing Class of 2020,
fulfill that charge to transform to a better society
with your educated spirit of the nurse.
We celebrate you and extend our care,
love, gratitude, and confidence in you.
Today's ceremony is unique and special in another way,
and that it is our first commencement in partnership with
the Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality and Healing.
Here with a message for
the graduates is its founder and director,
professor Mary Jo Kreitzer.
[Mary Jo Kreitzer] >> Congratulations, graduates of
the Integrative Health Coaching master's and
graduate certificate in
Integrative Health and Healing programs.
I'm Mary Jo Kreitzer,
the director of the Earl E.
Bakken Center for Spirituality and Healing.
I applaud you for embarking on
careers that are the future of health care.
With the COVID-19 pandemic,
the vulnerabilities and limitations of
our health care system have become even more apparent.
Through your education, you have learned
about the importance of whole person care,
mental health, and
the critical role of lifestyle behaviors.
Knowledge and skill in these areas is
critical to well-being and human flourishing.
We will look forward to hearing
about the career paths you are pursuing.
Paths that will undoubtedly take you to many places,
including health care worksites,
schools, and community based settings.
On behalf of your faculty at the Bakken Center,
I offer our hearty congratulations.
Hail to thee, and well
wishes in all of your future pursuits.
>> Dr. Deborah Trautman,
We are grateful that you are able to
share your thoughts with the class of 2020 in this video.
We still look forward to hosting you in
person in the future. Graduates and guests,
Dr. Trautman is the President and
CEO of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing,
has authored countless publications on health policy and
served on high profile boards and
advisory groups for the Department of Veteran Affairs,
National Academies of Science,
and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
You can find Dr. Trautman's
distinguished bio in our commencement program.
She is a remarkable leader,
a true champion for nurses and
nursing education. Graduates of the class of 2020,
it is my honor to present Dr. Deborah Trautman.
[Dr. Deborah Trautman] >> Thank you for the opportunity to participate in
this celebration of accomplishment and success.
I'm so pleased to join you virtually today for
this important milestone in
your life and in your career.
Today is a great occasion for celebration on many levels.
First, we celebrate your individual achievement.
You worked hard to achieve this success
and I congratulate you.
We also celebrate those who
inspired and supported you along this journey.
In addition to the faculty and your fellow students,
this day would not be possible
without the support of family, friends,
colleagues, and others who motivated
you and provided counsel to you along the way.
Few of us make this journey alone.
Their support was instrumental in your success,
and it's important to recognize those who helped make
this happen. In the larger context,
today is also a celebration
for the nursing profession.
You have been prepared by the finest nurse educators
in the nation, which benefits you,
the profession, and the
patients and the communities that you will serve.
You are part of
the solution to improving health and health care.
As a University of Minnesota
School of Nursing graduate,
you're entering a new chapter of your life.
This chapter will be filled with
choices, change and opportunity.
The chances you take, the choices you make,
there's much ahead to consider.
Nelson Mandela said there is
no passion to be found playing small
and settling for a life that's
less than the one you are capable of living.
Live the life you are capable of
living, with its successes and failures,
and make time to celebrate yourself,
challenge yourself, and care for yourself.
Even as we face challenges
during this unprecedented time,
we're reminded of the gift of celebration.
We have witnessed the celebrations of
our nation's health professionals
and other essential workers.
Our appreciation of the importance of
these celebrations is universal, and brings joy,
even in challenging moments.
As we celebrate your success today,
remember, success is never final.
Always strive to know more,
learn more, and apply the knowledge gained along the way.
Strive to create a better tomorrow,
dare to imagine what might be and strive to achieve it.
In celebration of your graduation,
I share a quote from Doris Kearns Goodwin,
a world renowned historian and Pulitzer Prize
winning bestselling author. Doris said,
"More and more,
it seems to me the best thing in life is to
have a piece of work worth doing and then doing it well."
You have chosen work worth
doing, and I wish you
a lifelong career of doing it well.
In closing, I salute you all.
I wish you joy, success, prosperity, and a life filled with meaning.
Thank you and congratulations.
>> Thank you, Deb, for your remarks and
for being part of this special occasion.
We are deeply grateful to AACN and
your exceptional leadership in lifting up
the voice of nursing. Graduates,
if we were at Northrop,
this would be the moment you had all been waiting for.
You would've come forward,
walked across the stage as your name was read,
and our BSN graduates would have
received their nursing pins, and
our doctoral students would have
their doctoral hoods placed
over their gowns by the faculty.
The pinning ceremony is
a tradition that dates back to 1913,
and it represents a welcoming of
new graduates to the nursing profession by their school.
We want to uphold this tradition in a new way this year.
We ask our BSN graduates to
invite a family member or
significant person in your life to
present you with the pin you received in the mail
and pin it to your regalia or graduation attire.
The tradition of academic hooding dates back even
further to 12th and 13th century Europe.
It too will continue in a new way in 2020.
At this time,
we invite our doctoral students with
regalia to have family members
or significant people in
your life perform the hooding ceremony.
If you don't have regalia,
we encourage you to improvise.
Adaptability is a hallmark of
this pandemic and of the nursing profession.
We encourage all of our graduates to take
pictures or videos of your home ceremonies
and celebration and post them to Instagram or
Twitter with the hashtag #UMNnurse2020.
By doing this, they will
appear on this virtual commencement page.
We so look forward to seeing your home celebrations.
Please remember: our home and
virtual celebrations are not
a replacement to commencement.
We will schedule an in-person ceremony
when possible so that the class of
2020 can walk across the stage and we
can again formally acknowledge
all that you have accomplished.
Graduates of the Class of 2020,
and on behalf of
the University of Minnesota and
the faculty and staff of the School of Nursing,
we share our sincere congratulations.
We are tremendously proud of all that you have achieved.
We're even more excited about all that you will
accomplish in nursing and
health care in the years to come.

Transcript

[Dean Connie White Delaney] Students, family members, friends, faculty, staff, and guests.
Welcome to the University of Minnesota School of Nursing 2020 virtual commencement ceremony.
We share deep gratitude to and for you.
We are honored to share this moment to award your degrees and certificates acknowledging your scholarly achievement, and exceptional practice.
Today we come together as community to celebrate, even though we can't physically gather.
Graduates of the Class of 2020 - While you won't be walking across the Northrop stage today, you will be walking through history.
This is a special class that will forever be remembered and not because it was the first to have its classes and commencement ceremony shifted to online.
The class of 2020 will forever be remembered because what you have experienced will make you different.
It will shape the way you pursue the profession.
You'll carry forward the imagination and innovation that have been lived in your final months of being students.
These will remind you of what is possible.
They will remind you of the resilience you have shown.
These experiences will empower you throughout your career and life.
We celebrate the class of 2020 in the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife, and just days after the 200th anniversary of the birth of Florence Nightingale.
It is amazing that the focus on infection control, data, sanitation, sun, and the care, love and compassion for others that have been revealed in this pandemic were all rooted in her experiences in the Crimean war more than 160 years ago.
And did you know that the first public health nursing courses offered by our school was in response to the influenza impact of 1917.
Experiences shape the future, and there is little doubt the class of 2020 will have a profound impact on the future of nursing.
Graduates, your future is now, you will begin making an impact immediately.
Why nursing? Why now, you ask? Nursing encompasses leading and collaborating in the care of individuals of all ages, babies, families, groups, communities.
Nursing embraces the sick or well, in all health living and community settings.
And nursing embraces the essential synergy across the promotion of health, prevention of illness, care of the ill, disabled, and dying people.
Nursing fosters empowering the people, families, and communities to perform all activities contributing to health, or recovery, or to dignified death and performing these when others are unable.
Nursing helps individuals, families, and communities gain full or partial independence as rapidly as possible.
Nursing gives bold voice to advocacy, promotion of safe environments, and a central call for research that supports fact-based interventions and participation in shaping health policy.
Nursing serves in the support and management of care of patients and in health systems.
Nursing ensures education for the next generations of nurses. Look around, and never has there been a greater need for nurses.
Indeed, we are reaching a new level of appreciation for the profession and its potential.
I close with the words of Richard Olding Beard, a non-nurse whose pioneering advocacy led to the first successful effort to establish nursing in an institution of higher learning, the very one for which you are earning your degree.
Beard highlighted the "educated spirit of the nurse", noting, "Nurses help society recognize the worth of human life, conserve human health, and provide for social justice." School of Nursing Class of 2020, fulfill that charge to transform to a better society with your educated spirit of the nurse.
We celebrate you and extend our care, love, gratitude, and confidence in you.
Today's ceremony is unique and special in another way, and that it is our first commencement in partnership with the Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality and Healing.
Here with a message for the graduates is its founder and director, professor Mary Jo Kreitzer.
[Mary Jo Kreitzer] >> Congratulations, graduates of the Integrative Health Coaching master's and graduate certificate in Integrative Health and Healing programs.
I'm Mary Jo Kreitzer, the director of the Earl E.
Bakken Center for Spirituality and Healing.
I applaud you for embarking on careers that are the future of health care.
With the COVID-19 pandemic, the vulnerabilities and limitations of our health care system have become even more apparent.
Through your education, you have learned about the importance of whole person care, mental health, and the critical role of lifestyle behaviors.
Knowledge and skill in these areas is critical to well-being and human flourishing.
We will look forward to hearing about the career paths you are pursuing.
Paths that will undoubtedly take you to many places, including health care worksites, schools, and community based settings.
On behalf of your faculty at the Bakken Center, I offer our hearty congratulations.
Hail to thee, and well wishes in all of your future pursuits.
>> Dr. Deborah Trautman, We are grateful that you are able to share your thoughts with the class of 2020 in this video.
We still look forward to hosting you in person in the future. Graduates and guests, Dr. Trautman is the President and CEO of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, has authored countless publications on health policy and served on high profile boards and advisory groups for the Department of Veteran Affairs, National Academies of Science, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
You can find Dr. Trautman's distinguished bio in our commencement program.
She is a remarkable leader, a true champion for nurses and nursing education. Graduates of the class of 2020, it is my honor to present Dr. Deborah Trautman.
[Dr. Deborah Trautman] >> Thank you for the opportunity to participate in this celebration of accomplishment and success.
I'm so pleased to join you virtually today for this important milestone in your life and in your career.
Today is a great occasion for celebration on many levels.
First, we celebrate your individual achievement.
You worked hard to achieve this success and I congratulate you.
We also celebrate those who inspired and supported you along this journey.
In addition to the faculty and your fellow students, this day would not be possible without the support of family, friends, colleagues, and others who motivated you and provided counsel to you along the way.
Few of us make this journey alone.
Their support was instrumental in your success, and it's important to recognize those who helped make this happen. In the larger context, today is also a celebration for the nursing profession.
You have been prepared by the finest nurse educators in the nation, which benefits you, the profession, and the patients and the communities that you will serve.
You are part of the solution to improving health and health care.
As a University of Minnesota School of Nursing graduate, you're entering a new chapter of your life.
This chapter will be filled with choices, change and opportunity.
The chances you take, the choices you make, there's much ahead to consider.
Nelson Mandela said there is no passion to be found playing small and settling for a life that's less than the one you are capable of living.
Live the life you are capable of living, with its successes and failures, and make time to celebrate yourself, challenge yourself, and care for yourself.
Even as we face challenges during this unprecedented time, we're reminded of the gift of celebration.
We have witnessed the celebrations of our nation's health professionals and other essential workers.
Our appreciation of the importance of these celebrations is universal, and brings joy, even in challenging moments.
As we celebrate your success today, remember, success is never final.
Always strive to know more, learn more, and apply the knowledge gained along the way.
Strive to create a better tomorrow, dare to imagine what might be and strive to achieve it.
In celebration of your graduation, I share a quote from Doris Kearns Goodwin, a world renowned historian and Pulitzer Prize winning bestselling author. Doris said, "More and more, it seems to me the best thing in life is to have a piece of work worth doing and then doing it well." You have chosen work worth doing, and I wish you a lifelong career of doing it well.
In closing, I salute you all.
I wish you joy, success, prosperity, and a life filled with meaning.
Thank you and congratulations.
>> Thank you, Deb, for your remarks and for being part of this special occasion.
We are deeply grateful to AACN and your exceptional leadership in lifting up the voice of nursing. Graduates, if we were at Northrop, this would be the moment you had all been waiting for.
You would've come forward, walked across the stage as your name was read, and our BSN graduates would have received their nursing pins, and our doctoral students would have their doctoral hoods placed over their gowns by the faculty.
The pinning ceremony is a tradition that dates back to 1913, and it represents a welcoming of new graduates to the nursing profession by their school.
We want to uphold this tradition in a new way this year.
We ask our BSN graduates to invite a family member or significant person in your life to present you with the pin you received in the mail and pin it to your regalia or graduation attire.
The tradition of academic hooding dates back even further to 12th and 13th century Europe.
It too will continue in a new way in 2020.
At this time, we invite our doctoral students with regalia to have family members or significant people in your life perform the hooding ceremony.
If you don't have regalia, we encourage you to improvise.
Adaptability is a hallmark of this pandemic and of the nursing profession.
We encourage all of our graduates to take pictures or videos of your home ceremonies and celebration and post them to Instagram or Twitter with the hashtag #UMNnurse2020.
By doing this, they will appear on this virtual commencement page.
We so look forward to seeing your home celebrations.
Please remember: our home and virtual celebrations are not a replacement to commencement.
We will schedule an in-person ceremony when possible so that the class of 2020 can walk across the stage and we can again formally acknowledge all that you have accomplished.
Graduates of the Class of 2020, and on behalf of the University of Minnesota and the faculty and staff of the School of Nursing, we share our sincere congratulations.
We are tremendously proud of all that you have achieved.
We're even more excited about all that you will accomplish in nursing and health care in the years to come.